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Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Faora Ul Revamp



A few years ago I created a Faora Ul costume from Man of Steel. For anyone who doesn't know, its a full body armor costume. I had never worked with foam on such a large scale before, but I completed it and was somewhat content with it at the time. Fast forward to the past month. I decided that I wanted to redo that costume now that I have more experience with foam. As part of my Patreon re-launch, I chose Faora to be my cosplay of the month. This go around I had a better understanding of creating the pieces and felt more confident. But I will say that I am glad to be finished with it. It was fun to redo, but my heart (and skill) is with sewing!


Construction Notes:

This costume was broken down into two parts:
1. Sewing pieces
2. Fabrication pieces

Bodysuit: For the bodysuit, I needed something that would look textured. The closest thing I could find was chain mail. While it's not an exact match for the material of Faora's movie bodysuit, it was as close as I could find. I sewed the torso first, then attached the legs and arms. I made the gloves separately also. The cape was a simple rectangle I top stitched and then used Velcro to adhere it to the breastplate

Armor Pieces by section:
  • Breastplate- This was by far the most complicated part of the entire costume. To start, my husband wrapped me in saran wrap and duct tape around my back and chest about down to my rib cage. On top of the duct tape (I used a gray color so I could see where I was marking) I drew my pattern for the base of my breastplate. Then I not-so-carefully cut myself out. I cut a hole in the middle of my favorite tank top. Then I took the pattern and cut it into three sections, back, front left and front right. I traced each piece on 10mm EVA foam. I also needed to cut out smaller odd shapes for the middle of the breastplate, those were cut out of 5mm EVA foam. Then I used a heat gun to not only smooth out the texture of the foam, but to also heat and shape the pieces so they had contour. The more difficult part of this process was attaching the collar. It was a wonky shape to begin with. Once they were shaped, I adhered everything together using Contact Cement. I had to do the collar in increments however. I did the two front pieces, let that cure overnight, did higher up, let that cure overnight, and then did the very back.  I let the adhesive cure overnight, and the next day I sealed the entire thing with 4 layers of white PVC glue and then painted it all a base color of dark metallic silver.
  • Gloves- These were by far my favorite thing to make. After I sewed the gloves together, I used card stock to create the basic shape of the finger joint armor and top of the hand armor. I then traced each finger joint onto 5mm EVA foam. Once each piece was cut out of the foam, I again used the heat gun to shape them. Then I used contact cement to adhere the foam pieces to the appropriate finger directly onto the fabric of the glove. Once all the pieces were on, I let it cure overnight and then sealed with 4 layers of white PVC glue and then painted them also a dark metallic silver.
  • Misc. Pieces- This includes the belt pieces, knee & shin guards, bracers, bicep pieces. The knee and shin guards were cut from 10mm EVA foam, but the rest of the pieces were cut from 5mm foam. Each piece was sketched out on paper and that was used as a template for the foam. The front sides of the belt I used strips of 5mm foam to accent and add detail. For the right bracer, I used a soldering iron to emboss ridges. After everything was cut from foam the pieces were heated and shaped using my heat gun. I used elastic to hold the armor pieces on. All but the thigh guards. Those were adhered directly onto the thighs of my bodysuit. Once everything was attached, cut and shaped, I sealed it all with 4 layers of white PVC glue and painted them a dark metallic silver.
Once everything had at least two base coats of the dark metallic silver, I went back over around the edges, in creases and around corners with a watered down mix of a little bit of dark silver paint, and more black paint in order to do some weathering. I learned my lesson from last time to do all the weathering at the same time and to slowly build on it. I started off with a little bit of darkening and then went over each section a second time to darken it.

I truly enjoyed making this costume. I feel like I know way more about working with foam than I did my first go around and that knowledge really helped. It was challenging at some spots, but I was happy to tackle the challenges. All in all I am happy with the costume but I am also glad that it's finished. Now I can focus on my current project! Check out the News page here on the blog to see what I'm working on now, or visit my Patreon to find out how you can get some cool rewards!


lotsa love to ya!

I'm Von! I'm a lifestyle blogger based in Massachusetts. I have a passion for nerd culture, food and movies. To find out more about me and this blog, take a look at the About Me page!

2 comments:

  1. Idon't know why, but, u don't look like Faora a bit! lol lol lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But thts okay! I enjoyed making this costume and I'm happy with how it looks!

      Delete

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